Michael Lacey
--Michael Lacey is trying to do too many things with not enough time. Can you relate?
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Reads

Reads

 

Reads and Recommendations

I do most of my listening through Audible. Click here or above to get started, and you’ll get all this with your free trial:

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Now that you’ve helped establish my financial security for the rest of my life, we can get to the good stuff!

My top 3 will change every few months as I continue to discover great new books. Got any recommendations or questions about mine? Let me know on Instagram @mycoolac or email me at michael@michaellacey.me

Included below: Top 3 | Current Favorites | 50 books read in 2018 | 30 books read in 2017 | Books before 2017

 
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Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

This is my all-time favorite audiobook experience. The movie was actually pretty incredible. Don’t think of it as ‘the movie’ vs. the book. Think of it as a reimagining of the book where Spielburg took the main concepts and kind of made his version of it. I do wish War Games would’ve made an appearance instead of The Shining , but I get it, Steve.

 
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A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness based on an idea by Siobhan Dowd, illustrated by Jim Kay

A friend, Daniel, recommended this to me during the season when my mother was battling cancer. The story is about a young boy whose mother is fighting cancer, and it really did take me to some vulnerable places. I experienced a lot of healing from this book as well as needed perspective and inspiration. Wonderfully written and deeply felt.

I highly recommend getting the paperback version for just a few dollars more. It’s a beautiful book in every way (and a quick read). I haven’t seen the movie, but I don’t expect much from it, for some reason. This is one that will exist more beautifully in my memory.

 
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Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

Of all the books I’ve read or listened to, this is one I can’t seem to shake. I listened to it while going through an incredibly stressful time in life, so that surely helped lock it in. However, it’s quite the read and I highly recommend it, especially if you like magic, both the imaginary sort and the real kind.

I’m sure this book is a great read, but the audiobook performance (by the legendary Jim Dale, narrator of the Harry Potter Series and Winnie the Pooh) brings these characters to life in such fantastic ways.

Current Favorites:

We’ve already covered the top three: Ready Player One, A Monster Calls, and The Night Circus. Here are some more:

*The Ocean at the End of the Lane (Neil Gaiman) https://amzn.to/2RJEcf4 Audio: https://amzn.to/2M1zpA8 

This was my first Gaiman, and it opened my mind in so many ways. It made me love literature again, or at least realize that I had loved it before, even when I was forced to read as a child. Since then, I’ve begun to devour books, even though it has ruined most for me because very few live up to this one. I have a hard time picking another Gaiman read because I’m afraid it won’t live up to his true talent, but they always do.


*Second Hand Curses (Drew Hayes) https://amzn.to/2CMpYl

So refreshing! This Brothers-Grimm-like approach to fairytales mixed with Robin Hood heist type stories makes this one a must-read experience.



*The Contractors (Luke S. Ball) https://amzn.to/2RtbDSS This one almost made my top 3, and it might jump up there if it ever gets a series. It just gives you everything you want as a reader. Though it is hardly anything like it, it reminds me of Dragon Ball Z (https://amzn.to/2SPT74K) with the power involved and the insurmountable odds against a scrappy fighter who gets stronger with each fight. 


*Stardust (Neil Gaiman) https://amzn.to/2VrKBdD  Movie: https://amzn.to/2CMdREY

You might notice this author showing up more than others. His work is kind of amazing. I’d seen the movie a while back, maybe ten or so years, and I absolutely loved it. Sadly, some of the best parts (sky-pirates) of the movie weren’t in the book much, or at least not the same way. This is one where the movie (https://amzn.to/2CMdREY) is still good after having read the book. However, as always, the book goes so much further and is really fantastic. I seem to use that word a lot when referring to Neil Gaiman books. 

*Good, Clean Fun (Offerman) https://amzn.to/2BWWeR7

As a budding woodworker myself, the termites biting in hard in the months before and after this read, I couldn’t get enough of this book. Ron Swanson, uh hmm, I mean Nick Offerman, is a gentle and magical creature who has that rare vision that allows people to see beauty in craft and who understands a lifelong devotion to said craft. Also, his language is just plain silly sometimes and his vocabulary is one I aspire to. 

Side note, if you’re interested in my woodworking journey or perhaps picking up a handmade, quality trinket (or commissioning a piece), check it out here LINK and follow me on Instagram @mycoolac. 

*The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto (Mitch Albom)  https://amzn.to/2BYWkHM 

Something about this book seemed—I don’t know . . . hokey, maybe? Or over-the-top? It just seemed like a waste of time to read about a musician who never really existed in the first place, one who was supposedly the best who ever lived (though he didn’t). Well, I was proven wrong. This story is incredibly rich and appeals to so many parts of me, the musician, the poet, the creative, the storyteller, the admirer of other musicians, and more. My favorite part was when Django Rienhardt showed up—yes, this story takes place in our world, our universe, and has our real musicians in it.

*Have a Nice Day (Billy Crystal) https://amzn.to/2RxJyty

Let’s be honest; I NEEDED to get 50 books done in a year and I was running out of time. This one is more of a play, and it is incredible, better than most of the books on this list that I wasted MUCH more time on. It solidified Billy Crystal as one of my favorite humans on earth today, and it got me feeling and thinking and growing and more. 

*Wild at Heart (John Elderidge) https://amzn.to/2CcNQwL 

“Deep in his heart, every man longs for a battle to fight, an adventure to live, and a beauty to rescue.” Need I say more?

Here’s are some more great quotes in this book: https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/5967-wild-at-heart-revised-and-updated-discovering-the-secret-of-a-man-s-sou 

*The Barbarian Way (Erwin McManus) https://amzn.to/2SNXcGy 

This book is so good! It inspired at least one of the devotionals I use to inspire my worship team; I also put that devo in my book, As We Fight https://amzn.to/2LMGqEW.

*Norse Mythology (Neil Gaiman) https://amzn.to/2RsfdwA

So informative but in great story-telling fashion. It’s not at all like I thought it’d be. There’s very little lecture-style teaching; it’s mostly adventures and magnificent stories that all tie together beautifully. I’ll be listening to this one again soon. 

*The Bobiverse Series (Dennis Taylor) https://amzn.to/2VJSMST 

-We Are Bob https://amzn.to/2Rlqu2G 

-For We Are Many https://amzn.to/2M8pGby 

-All These Worlds https://amzn.to/2SKM4Ko 

This is such a refreshing series. Finally, humor AND sci-fi that actually works well together. Like all good sci-fi, it makes you wish you could experience the life of the main character—or lives of the main character . . . hooked yet? It’s totally worth the credits.

50 Books Read Completely in 2018:

Year One (Nora Roberts) https://amzn.to/2R52C3a

Witches, young love, and end-of-the-world tropes; if that’s what you’re into, go for it. I finished it, but it wasn’t for me. Maybe the second book, Of Blood and Bone, might get my attention again.

Dad is Fat (Jim Gaffigan) https://amzn.to/2Rr5WF4

Listening to this is certainly the best way. It’s no stand-up routine, but it feels like a privilege to get such insight into Gaffigan’s life.

*I Am Legend (Matheson) https://amzn.to/2RmhLwn

This one surprised me. It was written in the seventies and isn’t really like the Will Smith movie. In many ways, it’s better.

*Unfu*k Yourself (Gary John Bishop) https://amzn.to/2RxIHZS

Don’t let the vulgar title deter you. Bishop isn’t too foul-mouthed, and when he is, it seems to be for good reason: to kick us into gear, into action, and into the lives that we really want to live.

Stinker Lets Loose! (James Taylor Johnson and Mike Sacks) https://amzn.to/2Rr6yum 

Definitely the craziest book I’ve listened to. Not for sensitive ears, this really reaches the immature teenager part of my soul, and it tickles it well. Jon Hamm really hams it up in this one. If you love Smokey and the Bandit and National Lampoon stuff, this is right up your alley.

Commune, Book 1 (Joshua Gayou) https://amzn.to/2RsdirN

The narration is fabulous, but it’s the only reason I’d want to return for book 2. The story is interesting, but the characters change in the next book, just when I finally started to like the originals.

*Light Falls, Einstein (Greene) https://amzn.to/2VqFjzi

Two words/names: Paul Rudd. His narration makes this even more interesting, and it’s amazing anyways. It’s more than worth the time and money.

Brave New World (Aldous Huxley) https://amzn.to/2R1YEZ3 

Apparently, this is a must-read classic from long ago—in the 1930s! With that in mind, it’s really incredible, but it can certainly be overwhelming at times.

The Protectors (T. N. Simmons) https://amzn.to/2LMNelS

This is actually from another local writer in North MS and is a great debut. If you like witches and romance with a dash of mystery/suspense, it’s worth a try.

The 5th Wave (Rick Yancey) https://amzn.to/2SvV9Xr 

Among all the young adult dystopian novels, this one is forgettable. It relies on too many tropes and doesn’t have enough uniqueness to stand out for me. I guess they thought it was interesting enough to make into a movie https://amzn.to/2RA0AHs, but it’s clear to me why they didn’t continue the series; I certainly didn’t.

How to Stop Time (Matt Haig) https://amzn.to/2SylUuh 

This one, like many time-travel stories, is sad and reflective. However, it is NOT a time travel story in the traditional sense. It’s about a man who lives for a very long time. There is no “Back to the Future” traveling as I hoped there’d be.

Four, Divergent (Veronica Roth) https://amzn.to/2BZ47FF 

I know, I committed a cardinal sin by skipping the Divergent Series and just listening to Four. Hey, I watched the movies . . . After listening to Four, I don’t feel like I missed out on much.

Odd and the Frost Giants (Neil Gaiman) https://amzn.to/2RphvN7 

Gaiman is gold. This story is fantastic in every sense of the word.

New York Deep (Andrew J. Morgan) https://amzn.to/2RyR9bC 

The Black Star of Kingston (Smith) https://amzn.to/2SzN5Vw 

I’m kind of a sucker for rabbits and middle grade fiction (really enjoyed the series Watership Down https://amzn.to/2LNPAB3). This one looks to have a sequel worth checking out https://amzn.to/2C9nRXl. I’d actually listened to The Green Ember (https://amzn.to/2RsCtuh) a year or two back and it was decent. I need to grab that sequel also (https://amzn.to/2RtH0fX)

*Norse Mythology (Neil Gaiman) https://amzn.to/2RsfdwA

So informative but in great story-telling fashion. It’s not at all like I thought it’d be. There’s very little lecture-style teaching; it’s mostly adventures and magnificent stories that all tie together beautifully. I’ll be listening to this one again soon. 

*The Screwtape Letters (Lewis) https://amzn.to/2RviB9U

Wow. This one took me longer to listen to than the quoted 3 or so hours. I had to rewind several times to try to comprehend some of these incredible insights. 

Six of Crows (Bardugo) LINK

What I loved about this book was the creative way it jumped from character to character while keeping the story flowing. In that way, it was well-written. That same jumping did make it a little hard to really sink into each character though.

The Inexplicable Universe: Unsolved Mysteries (Neil de Grasse Tyson) LINK

There’s no doubt about it, this dude is intelligent. I love how his mind works as not just a scientist, but as a…well, as a nerd, I mean in the superhero and fiction way. This book inspired so many stories that I can’t wait to write.

*A Gift of Time (Merritt) https://amzn.to/2VozpyC

This concept—reliving your life with all you know now—is something I think about and desire often. However, each life, as we find out, will always be very different than we could ever imagine.

*Bossypants (Tina Fey) https://amzn.to/2VpZpcX

Yes, I listened to both Poehler’s and Fey’s within a few months. Honestly, I liked Fey’s more overall, but they are both great. If I were a woman, there’s no doubt I’d love it even more.

*The Night Circus (Morgenstern) https://amzn.to/2VqCApB

Of all the books I’ve read or listened to, this is one I can’t seem to shake. I went through it while going through an incredibly stressful time in life, so that helped lock it in. However, it’s quite the read and I highly recommend it, especially if you like magic, both the imaginary and the real kind.

*Second Hand Curses (Drew Hayes) https://amzn.to/2CMpYl9

So refreshing! This Brothers-Grimm-like approach to fairytales mixed with Robin Hood heist type stories makes this one a must-read experience.

*A Tale of Three Kings (print, Edwards) https://amzn.to/2CNgTc5

Recommended by our lead pastor, this book is incredible for anyone in leadership of any kind, but it is especially helpful for serving or working at a church.

 

Speaking of church stuff, have you heard of my churchy book? https://amzn.to/2C2I3tU 

 

-Revival (King) https://amzn.to/2GRuNh7

King has a very specific voice, and it draws you in well. But, of course, he shakes you up and twists your brain so much that you wonder why you even considered going back to his madhouse. This one had all the right ingredients for me: music, religion, mysticism, and, arguably, science fiction. It also had the things that nightmares are made of, so watch out.

A Stephen King book that I did (mostly) enjoy . . . The Dark Tower LINK

I also really liked that show, The Mist (https://amzn.to/2SCPGy4) - it reminds me of my own mysical fiction series . . . Hmm, what’s it called again? Oh yeah, https://amzn.to/2LP2iiS

*Yes, Please (Amy Poehler) https://amzn.to/2SBaCW6 

This one was fun, but I’ll never get over the last few lines about taking care of her kids. My little boy is right in that age bracket she was talking about, putting lotion on her own kids and being grateful for those moments. Our little Nate has eczema, so I know all about that. That last, deeper-than-deep insight made this book more than memorable, it made it admirable.

The Singularity Trap (Dennis E. Taylor) https://amzn.to/2RpKDUr 

White Fang (Jack London) https://amzn.to/2RA7Hju 

It’s a classic for a reason. This one is great to listen to in the summer to cool you down or in the winter to make it more authentic.

Silver Linings Playbook (Matthew Quick) https://amzn.to/2AmnKrd

More foul language than I expected. I loved the movie (https://amzn.to/2s5HeeX) all those years ago, and I got this audiobook for free, so I jumped in. It was way deeper and less cinematic, but it has its moments. 

*Almost Interesting (David Spade) https://amzn.to/2RtcQto This one is hilarious, and really called out to my inner teenager side again. Spade has clearly had an interesting life, but this insight is really interesting and the stories are great, such as the time he almost got beat to death by his bodyguard. Of course, he talks about the great Chris Farley, which is likely one of the main reasons Spade even has a career, though he is legitimately funny.

*The Contractors (Luke S. Ball) https://amzn.to/2RtbDSS This one almost made my top 3, and it might jump up there if it ever gets a series. It just gives you everything you want as a reader. Though it is hardly anything like it, it reminds me of Dragon Ball Z (https://amzn.to/2SPT74K) with the power involved and the insurmountable odds against a scrappy fighter who gets stronger with each fight. 

Constitution (Nick Webb) https://amzn.to/2BWqFqC I gave this space opera a shot, but it didn’t stick. I’m hoping to write my own epic space adventure, so I need to learn more about the genre. I’m sure there are better ones—the Bobiverse series (https://amzn.to/2RFZBpd) is incredible, but I don’t know if it’s quite the same thing.

The Very First Damned Thing (Jodi Taylor) https://amzn.to/2Rw6xV

I love the cover and the premise, but this intro—through free and short—was not very good. If Taylor is to offer something like this as bait, it should be more representative of the rest if she wants to brings us into the series.

*My Bluegrass Baby (Molly Harper) https://amzn.to/2Rvuvkb

Not sure why I starred this one. I was trying to get into the romance writer’s mindset, but it made me realize that it might not be for me. I suppose the story was good and it never went so dark that I hated it.

When a Child is Born (Jodi Taylor) https://amzn.to/2RBZY4t

This one was much more interesting than the first one. I may look into this series https://amzn.to/2LQxnD9 after all. 

The New World Prequel (Patrick Ness) https://amzn.to/2C3nZHw

I can’t remember anything about this short read. I know it’s just a short story to get people into the series, but it was forgettable, or maybe just so short that I can’t recall it. I do like Ness’s A Monster Calls (one of my favorite books ever), so I’m sure the Chaos Walking series is good https://amzn.to/2LRmAZ2

*Stardust (Neil Gaiman) https://amzn.to/2VrKBdD  Movie: https://amzn.to/2CMdREY

You might notice this author showing up more than others. His work is kind of amazing. I’d seen the movie a while back, maybe ten or so years, and I absolutely loved it. Sadly, some of the best parts (sky-pirates) of the movie weren’t in the book much, or at least not the same way. This is one where the movie (https://amzn.to/2CMdREY) is still good after having read the book. However, as always, the book goes so much further and is really fantastic. I seem to use that word a lot when referring to Neil Gaiman books. 

-Girls & Boys (Dennis Kelly and Carey Mulligan) https://amzn.to/2VtXOmd 

Whoa. Do not read this, unless you like imagining some of the worst things (real things that can and do happen) you could imagine. I’ve never had a response to a story like I did with this one. The closest I remember feeling was in that bear scene (https://amzn.to/2C0Mhlp) with Leo, but that moment is child’s play (terrible choice of words) compared to the out-of-nowhere emotional bullet train that this short read brings.

-Year Zero (Rod Reid) https://amzn.to/2LNTdXH 

-Shop Class as Soulcraft (Matthew B. Crawford) https://amzn.to/2GTTny0 

There were some parts of this book that I loved such as the actually mechanic talk and him suping (do you remember that word?) up his old VW bug and the tales of motorcycle repair. But he really lost me when he went way to deep with some psychological and philosophical views of society. I didn’t hate it, but I wished it would pass faster. Basically, it’s not as cool as it sounds.

*Good, Clean Fun (Offerman) https://amzn.to/2BWWeR7

As a budding woodworker myself, the termites biting in hard in the months before and after this read, I couldn’t get enough of this book. Ron Swanson, uh hmm, I mean Nick Offerman, is a gentle and magical creature who has that rare vision that allows people to see beauty in craft and who understands a lifelong devotion to said craft. Also, his language is just plain silly sometimes and his vocabulary is one I aspire to. 

Side note, if you’re interested in my woodworking journey or perhaps picking up a handmade, quality trinket (or commissioning a piece), check it out here LINK and follow me on Instagram @mycoolac. 

*Liturgy of the Ordinary (Tish Harrison Warren) https://amzn.to/2R4UjnR 

*The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto (Mitch Albom)  https://amzn.to/2BYWkHM 

Something about this book seemed—I don’t know . . . hokey, maybe? Or over-the-top? It just seemed like a waste of time to read about a musician who never really existed in the first place, one who was supposedly the best who ever lived (though he didn’t). Well, I was proven wrong. This story is incredibly rich and appeals to so many parts of me, the musician, the poet, the creative, the storyteller, the admirer of other musicians, and more. My favorite part was when Django Rienhardt showed up—yes, this story takes place in our world, our universe, and has our real musicians in it.

*Have a Nice Day (Billy Crystal) https://amzn.to/2RxJyty

Let’s be honest; I NEEDED to get 50 books done in a year and I was running out of time. This one is more of a play, and it is incredible, better than most of the books on this list that I wasted MUCH more time on. It solidified Billy Crystal as one of my favorite humans on earth today, and it got me feeling and thinking and growing and more. 

Variant (JN Chaney) https://amzn.to/2RsTxAA

Series: https://amzn.to/2AsSerF 

Present Over Perfect (print, Shauna Niequist) https://amzn.to/2BUmyLt 

So, is it normal to take 9 months to read 200ish pages? That’s exactly why I do audiobooks. I read a handful of physical books in a year and nearly 50 audiobooks . . . you do the math. Well, I can, if you’d like. I actually have a degree in Math. LINK (blog-quitting/getting fired-full disclosure).

I highly recommend this for women and overachievers, but it was sometimes a chore for me. I appreciate it, but it’s hard to empathize with someone who is overworked from being TOO successful. Maybe one day I’ll get there. Then, I’ll come back to this book. The title alone can change your life though.

Jingle Bell Pop (Seabrook) https://amzn.to/2M3vAKS 

They alluded to teaching me how to write a hit Christmas song, but then they said it can’t be done. I hoped it would be more practical. It’s really a history of the current Christmas canon from “Silent Night” to “All I Want for Christmas is You” LINK. It’s informative and interesting and worth a listen when the season is near.

The Shoe Bird (Samuel Jones) https://amzn.to/2D1Pm6x 

Another short book to reach my goal . . . Jim Dale (narrator of such things as Harry Potter series and the voice of Pooh Bear himself) made it worth every minute.

*MirrorBall (Matt Redman) https://amzn.to/2RqXohr 

I don’t know why I waited so long for this one. It’s so good! I’ve had the paperback for over 5 years (thanks Josh H. For letting me ‘borrow’ it). Again, this is more proof that audio is better (for me) than print. I’ll go back and underline about half of this book one day.

The Dispatcher (John Scalzi) https://amzn.to/2ChTAFt 

Quick read to round out that ‘sexy’ number of 50. Once again, narration made this book better than it would’ve been otherwise. The concept is great, and I hope it gets a series or spinoff or film adaptation.







Books Read in 2017 (some of these were partial reads to help new authors with reviews)

Partial Reads and Reviews (my reviews are on their Amazon pages)

The Art of Apprenticeship

*The Odwin Chronicles, Guardians

The Saga of Cyrillus Severus (Kyle de Luca)

*Build Your Dream Team

Supernal Grace (Elenah Kangara)

Vocab-Backup Strategy

Energy Reset

Blind Prophet, Ep. 1

Overcoming Shyness

*Fearless Author (Alex Emma)

How to Be a Diva at Public Speaking

Life Sucks, Seek God

Praying in the Power Zone

How to Rock Restaurant Management

Little Moments, Big God (Jodi Arndt) ???

100 Life Strategies

Stronger than the Storm (Michelle Laine)

The Fat Kid Within

Personal Reads, both physical and audio:

Living Forward: A Proven Plan to Stop Drifting and Get the Life You Want (Michael Hyatt) https://amzn.to/2MaAlTb 

The focus of this book is not so much getting the life you want right now, but making a ‘life plan’ that will help you live the life you want, based on looking back at it at the end of your life . . . If that makes sense. I read most of it, though I never really wrote my life plan, not completely. It’s a big task, and I outlined a lot of it and wrote parts of it, but mostly, I just internalized a lot of the thoughts and mindsets that Hyatt suggested.

*A Monster Calls https://amzn.to/2RtyxcL (see top 3)

True Worshippers (Bob Kauflin) https://amzn.to/2M1wZl2 

I read the paperback, and it took way too long. I guess I’m not a fan of Kauflin, though I don’t disagree with him most of the time. I just had a hard time getting much from this book. I got a lot more from Redman’s Mirrorball https://amzn.to/2RqXohr and The Unquenchable Worshipper https://amzn.to/2M2jOAo  Louie Giglio’s This Air I Breathe https://amzn.to/2Rl1usb and I Am Not, but I Know I Am https://amzn.to/2REgLDY, and Steven Miller’s Worship Leaders, We are Not Rock Stars https://amzn.to/2RFkjpu - I imagine people might get a lot from my own worship devotional as well https://amzn.to/2RjGsKu.

*The Ocean at the End of the Lane (Neil Gaiman) https://amzn.to/2RJEcf4 Audio: https://amzn.to/2M1zpA8 

This was my first Gaiman, and it opened my mind in so many ways. It made me love literature again, or at least realize that I had loved it before, even when I was forced to read as a child. Since then, I’ve begun to devour books, even though it has ruined most for me because very few live up to this one. I have a hard time picking another Gaiman read because I’m afraid it won’t live up to his true talent, but they always do.

Dark Tower I (King)

Pretty decent. It proves why King is who he is; the story is great and the writing sucks you into his manic vortex like a gutter sucks down rain . . . and children . . . Too far? Side note: I have not, nor ever will watch or read It.

Funny Amazon Reviews (read by Jane Lynch)

Not sure if this counts as a ‘book,’ but oh my, these are terrific.

Paddle Your Own Canoe (Nick Offerman)

If he avoided religion and some other touchy subjects, then I would’ve enjoyed it more, but if he didn’t avoid them, it wouldn’t be Ron Swanson, uh hmm, I mean Nick Offerman. Is that joke getting old yet? I didn’t think so.

Born Standing Up (Steve Martin)

Steve Martin’s life was not like I’d imagined. First off, he wasn’t born with white hair. If that wasn’t strange enough, it turns out that he wasn’t naturally talented like many other comedians. He knew from early on that he wanted to make comedy and worked his butt off to do it.

*How to Fly a Horse (Kevin Ashton) https://amzn.to/2SNw7mR

This is quite the book. One of my favorite parts was how it broke down the fact that the production of a can of Coca-Cola LINK touches every continent except Antarctica; if there are polar bears there, then the marketing gets that loophole. “Fact check: polar bears do not exist in Antarctica, so that thought trail was a bust.”

*The Bobiverse Series (Dennis Taylor) https://amzn.to/2VJSMST 

-We Are Bob https://amzn.to/2Rlqu2G 

-For We Are Many https://amzn.to/2M8pGby 

-All These Worlds https://amzn.to/2SKM4Ko 

This is such a refreshing series. Finally, humor AND sci-fi that actually works well together. Like all good sci-fi, it makes you wish you could experience the life of the main character—or lives of the main character . . . hooked yet? It’s totally worth the credits.

The Jester (Sullivan)

*Ready Player One (see top 3 list)

*The Call (O-Guilin)

Oh my goodness, this book is creepy. It’s really well done, though it goes beyond my comfort level quite few times. It dives deep—almost literally—into the fairy world, which is not a good place for human children to be. Before this, I really thought fairies were the good guys—like Tinkerbell and such. This is not the case. They are terribly evil, but they laugh and frolic the whole time they are twisting the children into unrecognizable shapes and creatures.







Books Before 2017 (that I can remember, basically book I chose to read—after college)

From Dude to Dad ( ) LINK

Every Man’s Battle ( ) LINK

*Wild at Heart (John Elderidge) https://amzn.to/2CcNQwL 

“Deep in his heart, every man longs for a battle to fight, an adventure to live, and a beauty to rescue.” Need I say more?

Here’s are some more great quotes in this book: https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/5967-wild-at-heart-revised-and-updated-discovering-the-secret-of-a-man-s-sou 

*I Am Not, but I Know I Am, (Giglio) https://amzn.to/2REgLDY

Quitter (Jon Acuff) LINK

*The Barbarian Way (Erwin McManus) https://amzn.to/2SNXcGy 

This book is so good! It inspired at least one of the devotionals I use to inspire my worship team; I also put that devo in my book, As We Fight https://amzn.to/2LMGqEW.


Need Help? Want to chat about reading, writing, or goal-setting?

Got any suggestions or recommendations? Maybe you’d like to chat about some of these books or my process? Email me at michael@michaellacey.me. Also, I’d love to help you on your author journey or with your goals—at no cost unless you want extensive help.

My books: As We Fight https://amzn.to/2LMGqEW, A Town Called Wonderful; Book 1 of The Underlands Series https://amzn.to/2LP2iiS